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Field Experiences


Field courses offer the opportunity for experiential learning. The following field courses are available:

Native Alaska: Culture and Ecology

The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to Alaskan native culture, the Alaskan Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA), Alaskan geology and its ecology, and to evaluate how they intertwine in an indivisible manner. Students will develop a strong appreciation for the uniqueness of Alaska. Alaska’s rich native culture and geology have a profound effect on the regions ecology. Students will immerse themselves in the ecological wonders that Alaska affords such as glaciers, tundra, oceans, forests and more, culminating in a life-changing visit to Alaska, the world’s final frontier. A 7-day, post-semester trip to the State of Alaska is a required component of this course; this trip will incur an additional cost.

Tropical Ecology: Hawaii

This elective advanced topics course will expose students to the Polynesian culture and various ecosystems found in Hawaii. A ten-day field trip to the islands of Hawaii and Oahu during spring break is a required component of the course; this trip will incur an additional cost.

Southwest Ecology

This advanced topics course exposes students to the Native American Culture of New Mexico, including the ancient Anastazi/Mogolon culture, and to the different ecological environments that can be found in the Southwest, ranging from desert to alpine conditions. An eight-day field trip to New Mexico during May Term is a required component of the course; this trip will incur an additional cost. Students will be required to provide oral presentations covering the course topics. 

On the Ouachita

This course is an interdisciplinary and place-based approach to environmental sciences. The course incorporates perspectives from disciplines such as history, natural science, ecology and leisure studies and requires field work after the end of the regular semester.

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