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Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy seeks to provide a context in which students can think critically and creatively about fundamental questions posed by human life and experience. Confident that the search for truth ultimately points toward God as its source, we encourage students to participate in and contribute to the philosophic quest for truth, wisdom, and meaningful life.  We seek to engender a reflective approach to life that produces integrity of belief and action.

Considering law school? Many of our pre-law students have discovered that a philosophy background provides outstanding preparation for law school.
 

Philosophy Major

 

In addition to the University CORE (55 credit hours), the traditional Major in Philosophy (27 credit hours) requires a minor plus electives—or a second major plus possible electives—to total a minimum of 128 hours for graduation.

 

Foundational Courses (12 hours)

  • Introduction to Philosophy
  • Logic
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • Christian Theology


Additional Philosophy Courses (15 hours)

Students must also take 5 courses from the following list, at least 2 of which must be history of philosophy courses (*):

  • Ancient Philosophy*
  • Modern Philosophy*
  • Contemporary Philosophy*
  • Christian Ethics
  • Death and Dying
  • Issues in Science and Religion
  • Metaphysics and Epistemology
  • On the Ouachita
  • Western Political Thought I
  • Western Political Thought II
  • Workplace Ethics

 

Minor in Philosophy 

  • Introduction to Philosophy
  • Logic
  • Twelve hours (four courses) from Philosophy  (at least 6 hours at junior-senior level)

 

Philosophy Emphasis

 

A major in Christian Studies with an emphasis in Philosophy requires the completion of the University CORE, Internship/Service Component, the Christian Studies Basic Requirements and 12 hours in the following philosophy courses:

  • Logic
    An introduction to critical thinking and traditional logic, including argument analysis, fallacies and basic symbolic logic.

  • Death and Dying
    A study of the role of death in human experience, including historical and cultural views of death and afterlife, the nature of grief, and ethical issues related to death and dying.

  • Western Political Thought I
    As a systematic intellectual enterprise, theories of political philosophy address perennial problems of political relations. This course is an intensive analysis of the principal political theorists in the Western tradition from Plato through Machiavelli. Primary emphasis on their texts is complemented by consideration of the historical contexts within which they wrote.

  • Western Political Thought II
    As a systematic intellectual enterprise, theories of political philosophy address perennial problems of political relations. This course is an intensive analysis of the principal political theorists in the Western tradition extending from Hobbes onward. Primary emphasis on their texts is complemented by consideration of the historical contexts within which they wrote.

  • Metaphysics and Epistemology
    A study of contemporary problems and issues in metaphysics and epistemology. Spring of even-numbered years.

  • Issues in Science and Religion
    A study of the processes and products of theological reflection and scientific inquiry and issues that arise in the interaction of the two enterprises.

  • Ancient Philosophy
    A study of the ideas and arguments of major philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome.

  • Modern Philosophy
    A study of major philosophers and philosophical movements from the Renaissance through the 18th century.

  • Philosophy of Religion
    A study of the philosophy of religion, its method and the philosophical issues related to religious commitment. Fall of odd-numbered years.

  • Contemporary Philosophy
    A study of major philosophers and philosophical movements of the 19th and 20th centuries.

  • Workplace Ethics
    A study of ethical issues, dilemmas and desirable virtues pertinent to the workplace and common to many professions and careers.

  • On the Ouachita
    An interdisciplinary and place-based approach to environmental ethics. The course incorporates perspectives from disciplines such as history, natural science, and leisure studies and requires field work and travel after the end of the regular semester.

Questions about Philosophy?

Email:  Dr. Byron Eubanks
Phone:  870.245.5521

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