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Majors

The Division of Music offers professional degree programs in music designed to prepare students for careers as professional performers, composers, and educators. In addition, the Division offers a liberal arts degree for those seeking a broad, general coverage of the field. The Division offers the following degrees:

 

Performance

Bachelor of Music (concentrations in piano, voice, organ, reeds, flute, brass, or percussion)

  1. Performance. Students must acquire:

    1. Technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression in at least one major performance area at a level appropriate for the particular music concentration.
    2. An overview understanding of the repertory in their major performance area and the ability to perform from a cross-section of that repertory.
    3. The ability to read at sight with fluency demonstrating both general musicianship and, in the major performance area, a level of skill relevant to professional standards appropriate for the particular music concentration.
    4. Knowledge and skills sufficient to work as a leader and in collaboration on matters of musical interpretation. Rehearsal and conducting skills are required as appropriate to the particular music concentration.
    5. Keyboard competency.
    6. Growth in artistry, technical skills, collaborative competence and knowledge of repertory through regular ensemble experiences. Ensembles should be varied both in size and nature.

  2. Musicianship Skills and Analysis. Students must acquire:

    1. An understanding of the common elements and organizational patterns of music and their interaction, the ability to employ this understanding in aural, verbal, and visual analyses, and the ability to take aural dictation.
    2. Sufficient understanding of and capability with musical forms, processes, and structures to use this knowledge and skill in compositional, performance, analytical, scholarly, and pedagogical applications according to the requisites of their specializations.
    3. The ability to place music in historical, cultural, and stylistic contexts.

  3. Composition/Improvisation.

Students must acquire a rudimentary capacity to create original or derivative music. It is the prerogative of each institution to develop specific requirements regarding written, electronic, or improvisatory forms and methods. These may include but are not limited to the creation of original compositions or improvisations, variations or improvisations on existing materials, experimentation with various sound sources, the imitation of musical styles, and manipulating the common elements in non-traditional ways. Institutional requirements should help students gain a basic understanding of how to work freely and cogently with musical materials in various composition-based activities, particularly those most associated with the major field.

  1. History and Repertory.

Students must acquire basic knowledge of music history and repertories through the present time, including study and experience of musical language and achievement in addition to that of the primary culture encompassing the area of specialization.

  1. Synthesis.

While synthesis is a lifetime process, by the end of undergraduate study students must be able to work on musical problems by combining, as appropriate to the issue, their capabilities in performance; aural, verbal, and visual analysis; composition/improvisation; and history and repertory.

  1. Professionalism

By the end of undergraduate study students must have knowledge of the basic aspects of professionalism (such as copyright issues, interpersonal and speaking skills, ethics and standards, and developing effective publicity/marketing skills including writing resumes, interview skills, contract agreements, website creation, audio and video editing), which will prepare them for continued education and for careers in their areas of expertise.

 

Worship Arts

Bachelor of Music

  1. Performance. Students must acquire:

    1. Technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression in Vocal performance.
    2. An overview understanding of the repertory in vocal performance and the ability to perform from a cross-section of that repertory.
    3. The ability to read at sight with fluency demonstrating both general musicianship and, in vocal performance, a level of skill relevant to professional standards in vocal concentration.
    4. Knowledge and skills sufficient to work as a leader and in collaboration on matters of musical interpretation. Rehearsal and conducting skills are required as appropriate to vocal performance.
    5. Keyboard competency.
    6. Growth in artistry, technical skills, collaborative competence and knowledge of repertory through regular ensemble experiences. Ensembles should be varied both in size and nature.

  1. Musicianship Skills and Analysis. Students must acquire:
    1. An understanding of the common elements and organizational patterns of music and their interaction, the ability to employ this understanding in aural, verbal, and visual analyses, and the ability to take aural dictation.
    2. Sufficient understanding of and capability with musical forms, processes, and structures to use this knowledge and skill in compositional, performance, analytical, scholarly, and pedagogical applications according to the requisites of their specializations.
    3. The ability to place music in historical, cultural, and stylistic contexts.

  1. Composition/Improvisation.

Students must acquire a rudimentary capacity to create original or derivative music. It is the prerogative of each institution to develop specific requirements regarding written, electronic, or improvisatory forms and methods. These may include but are not limited to the creation of original compositions or improvisations, variations or improvisations on existing materials, experimentation with various sound sources, the imitation of musical styles, and manipulating the common elements in non-traditional ways. Institutional requirements should help students gain a basic understanding of how to work freely and cogently with musical materials in various composition-based activities, particularly those most associated with the major field.

  1. History and Repertory.

Students must acquire basic knowledge of music history and repertories through the present time, including study and experience of musical language and achievement in addition to that of the primary culture encompassing the area of specialization.

  1. Synthesis.

While synthesis is a lifetime process, by the end of undergraduate study students must be able to work on musical problems by combining, as appropriate to the issue, their capabilities in performance; aural, verbal, and visual analysis; composition/improvisation; and history and repertory.

  1. Comprehensive capabilities in the elements of sacred music, including the ability to perform, improvise, and conduct at the highest possible level(s) as appropriate to the area of specialization; achievement in a secondary area of performance (keyboard or voice).

  1. An understanding of musical religious practice including orders of worship, hymnology, administrative structures and procedures, and the relationships between sacred music and the music of general culture.

  1. An understanding of the interrelationship of sacred music with other art forms.


  2. At least one demonstration of performance abilities, and practicum opportunities within or beyond the institution that lead to demonstrations of competency to work in the field of sacred music. While these functions may be fulfilled in a variety of ways, a senior recital and an internship or similar formal experience are strongly recommended.

 

Musical Theatre

Bachelor of Music

  1. Performance. Students must acquire:
    1. Technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression in Vocal performance.
    2. An overview understanding of the repertory in vocal performance and the ability to perform from a cross-section of that repertory.
    3. The ability to read at sight with fluency demonstrating both general musicianship and, in vocal performance, a level of skill relevant to professional standards in vocal concentration.
    4. Knowledge and skills sufficient to work as a leader and in collaboration on matters of musical interpretation. Rehearsal and conducting skills are required as appropriate to vocal performance.
    5. Keyboard competency.
    6. Growth in artistry, technical skills, collaborative competence and knowledge of repertory through regular ensemble experiences. Ensembles should be varied both in size and nature.

 

  1. Musicianship Skills and Analysis. Students must acquire:
    1. An understanding of the common elements and organizational patterns of music and their interaction, the ability to employ this understanding in aural, verbal, and visual analyses, and the ability to take aural dictation.
    2. Sufficient understanding of and capability with musical forms, processes, and structures to use this knowledge and skill in compositional, performance, analytical, scholarly, and pedagogical applications according to the requisites of their specializations.
    3. The ability to place music in historical, cultural, and stylistic contexts.

  1. Composition/Improvisation.

Students must acquire a rudimentary capacity to create original or derivative music. It is the prerogative of each institution to develop specific requirements regarding written, electronic, or improvisatory forms and methods. These may include but are not limited to the creation of original compositions or improvisations, variations or improvisations on existing materials, experimentation with various sound sources, the imitation of musical styles, and manipulating the common elements in non-traditional ways. Institutional requirements should help students gain a basic understanding of how to work freely and cogently with musical materials in various composition-based activities, particularly those most associated with the major field.
 

  1. History and Repertory.

Students must acquire basic knowledge of music history and repertories through the present time, including study and experience of musical language and achievement in addition to that of the primary culture encompassing the area of specialization.

  1. Synthesis.

While synthesis is a lifetime process, by the end of undergraduate study students must be able to work on musical problems by combining, as appropriate to the issue, their capabilities in performance; aural, verbal, and visual analysis; composition/improvisation; and history and repertory.

  1. Professionalism

By the end of undergraduate study students must have knowledge of the basic aspects of professionalism (such as copyright issues, interpersonal and speaking skills, ethics and standards, and developing effective publicity/marketing skills including writing resumes, interview skills, contract agreements, website creation, audio and video editing), which will prepare them for continued education and for careers in their areas of expertise.

 

Music Education-Instrumental or Choral

Bachelor of Music Education

  1. Performance. Students must acquire:
    1. Technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression in at least one major performance area at a level appropriate for the particular music concentration.
    2. An overview understanding of the repertory in their major performance area and the ability to perform from a cross-section of that repertory.
    3. The ability to read at sight with fluency demonstrating both general musicianship and, in the major performance area, a level of skill relevant to professional standards appropriate for the particular music concentration.
    4. Knowledge and skills sufficient to work as a leader and in collaboration on matters of musical interpretation. Rehearsal and conducting skills are required as appropriate to the particular music concentration.
    5. Keyboard competency.
    6. Growth in artistry, technical skills, collaborative competence and knowledge of repertory through regular ensemble experiences. Ensembles should be varied both in size and nature.

  1. Musicianship Skills and Analysis. Students must acquire:
    1. An understanding of the common elements and organizational patterns of music and their interaction, the ability to employ this understanding in aural, verbal, and visual analyses, and the ability to take aural dictation.
    2. Sufficient understanding of and capability with musical forms, processes, and structures to use this knowledge and skill in compositional, performance, analytical, scholarly, and pedagogical applications according to the requisites of their specializations.
    3. The ability to place music in historical, cultural, and stylistic contexts.

  1. Composition/Improvisation.

Students must acquire a rudimentary capacity to create original or derivative music. It is the prerogative of each institution to develop specific requirements regarding written, electronic, or improvisatory forms and methods. These may include but are not limited to the creation of original compositions or improvisations, variations or improvisations on existing materials, experimentation with various sound sources, the imitation of musical styles, and manipulating the common elements in non-traditional ways. Institutional requirements should help students gain a basic understanding of how to work freely and cogently with musical materials in various composition-based activities, particularly those most associated with the major field.

  1. History and Repertory.

Students must acquire basic knowledge of music history and repertories through the present time, including study and experience of musical language and achievement in addition to that of the primary culture encompassing the area of specialization.

  1. Synthesis.

While synthesis is a lifetime process, by the end of undergraduate study students must be able to work on musical problems by combining, as appropriate to the issue, their capabilities in performance; aural, verbal, and visual analysis; composition/improvisation; and history and repertory.

  1. Demonstrate conducting competencies by the integration of analysis, style, performance practices, instrumentation, and baton techniques.


  2. Demonstrate arranging competencies through the arranging and adaptation of music from a variety of sources to meet the needs and abilities of school performing groups and classroom situations.


  3. Demonstrate a functional ability in voice, keyboard, wind, string, fretted and percussion instruments appropriate to the student's future teaching needs.


  4. Apply analytical and historical knowledge to curriculum development, lesson planning, and daily classroom and performance activities. Relate and understanding of musical styles, the literature of diverse cultural sources, and the music of various historical periods.


  5. MUED Choral - Demonstrate sufficient vocal and pedagogical skill to teach effective use of the voice.
    MUED Instrumental - Demonstrate a knowledge of and performance ability on wind, string and percussion instruments sufficient to teach beginning students effectively in groups.


  6. MUED Choral - Have experience in solo vocal performance and choral ensembles.
    MUED Instrumental - Have experiences in solo instrumental performance, as well as in both small and large instrumental ensembles.


  7. Have laboratory experience in teaching beginning vocal techniques or beginning instrumental students individually, in small groups and in large classes.

 

Music (with minor in other field)

Bachelor of Arts

  1. Performance. Students must acquire:
    1. Technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression in at least one major performance area at a level appropriate for the particular music concentration.
    2. An overview understanding of the repertory in their major performance area and the ability to perform from a cross-section of that repertory.
    3. The ability to read at sight with fluency demonstrating both general musicianship and, in the major performance area, a level of skill relevant to standards appropriate for the particular music concentration.
    4. Knowledge and skills sufficient to work as a leader and in collaboration on matters of musical interpretation. Rehearsal and conducting skills are required as appropriate to the particular music concentration.
    5. Growth in artistry, technical skills, collaborative competence and knowledge of repertory through regular ensemble experiences. Ensembles should be varied both in size and nature.

  1. Musicianship Skills and Analysis. Students must acquire:
    1. An understanding of the common elements and organizational patterns of music and their interaction, the ability to employ this understanding in aural, verbal, and visual analyses, and the ability to take aural dictation.
    2. Sufficient understanding of and capability with musical forms, processes, and structures to use this knowledge and skill in compositional, performance, analytical, scholarly, and pedagogical applications according to the requisites of their specializations.
    3. The ability to place music in historical, cultural, and stylistic contexts.

  1. Composition.

Students must acquire a rudimentary capacity to create original or derivative music. Institutional requirements should help students gain a basic understanding of how to work freely and cogently with musical materials in various composition-based activities, particularly those most associated with the major field.

  1. History and Repertory.

Students must acquire basic knowledge of music history and repertories through the present time, including study and experience of musical language and achievement in addition to that of the primary culture encompassing the area of specialization.

  1. Synthesis.

While synthesis is a lifetime process, by the end of undergraduate study students must be able to work on musical problems by combining, as appropriate to the issue, their capabilities in performance; aural, verbal, and visual analysis; composition; and history and repertory. Students should also integrate knowledge and skills from their major field of study with the broader liberal arts experience provided by the CORE curriculum.

 

Music Industry

Bachelor of Arts

  1. Music. Students must demonstrate that they have:
    1. The ability to hear, identify, and work conceptually and analytically with the elements of music—rhythm, melody, harmony, and structure. 
    2. A basic understanding of compositional processes, aesthetic properties of style, and ways these shape and are shaped by artistic and cultural forces.
    3. An acquaintance with a wide selection of musical literature, the principal eras, genres, and cultural sources, including, but not limited to, jazz, popular, classical, and world music forms.
    4. The ability to develop and defend musical judgments.
    5. A functional proficiency in at least one area of instrumental or vocal performance.

  1. Music Industry. Students must demonstrate that they have:
    1. An overview understanding of the music industry, including the functions and organizational structures of its basic component sectors, and the relationships of these sectors to each other.
    2. A working knowledge of the multiple ways the music industry and its sectors use principles and techniques of marketing, promotion, management, and merchandising, including the development, manufacturing, distribution, and retailing of musical products.
    3. A basic knowledge of the fundamental principles, issues, and systems associated with creative and intellectual property, including but not limited to copyright, publishing, contracts, licensing, patents, and trademarks.
    4. A functional knowledge of artist and concert management, including but not limited to promotion and production.
    5. An overview understanding of organizational structures, practices, and standard issues associated with music organizations.
    6. A basic understanding of how computers and information technologies influence the business environment, e-commerce, and the decisions of various sectors of the music industry.
    7. A basic knowledge of the major information and data sources that support or influence decision-making in the music industry and in business more generally.

  1. Business. Students must demonstrate that they have:
    1. An understanding of the fundamental principles of micro- and macro-economics sufficient to apply them to basic economic analysis, evaluation, and decision-making.
    2. A functional knowledge of accounting, including financial and managerial accounting.
    3. A basic understanding of principles, techniques, and common practices in business law, management, business ethics, and marketing, including but not limited to consumer behavior, market research, publicity, and public relations.
    4. A basic understanding of international business practices.

  1. Essential Experiences
    1. Ensemble Performance. Ensemble participation is required, normally for at least four semesters or six quarters. Participation in a variety of ensembles is recommended.
    2. Team Participation. There shall be one or more opportunities to (1) work on and (2) manage a team in a music industry-related project.
    3. Work in the Field. There shall be an organized internship program under the supervision of music industry faculty that involves regular consultation between the student and a supervising faculty member.


  1. Synthesis. While synthesis is a lifetime process, by the end of undergraduate study students should be:
    1. Integrating knowledge and skills in music, music industry, business, and general studies to address issues, projects, and problems in the music industry.
    2. Making independent, logical evaluations and judgments associated with the work of one or more sectors of the music industry.
    3. Developing the capacity to pose, analyze, and solve problems with an understanding of the interrelationships and interdependencies of various interests in and influences on the music industry.
    4. Seeking to develop their knowledge and skills in various aspects of the music industry and business more generally through study and personal experience.

 

Minor in Music

 

Minor in Music Industry

 


For degree requirements, click here.

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